Native Americans: Images in Popular Culture - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6 pages of information about Native Americans.
This section contains 1,597 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
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Initial Conceptions

The English adopted the term Indian from the Spanish to generically describe the native inhabitants of North America, even though Indian people almost never used such a collective term, instead preferring the actual tribal or community designation of an individual. The manner in which Indians identified other Indians emphasized their uniqueness, whereas Europeans tended to lump all Indians together when portraying their cultural values. Thus, from the beginning of contact, Euro-Americans in positions of cultural influence as writers, publishers, military officials, or politicians relied on generalizations about how Indians lived, why they acted the way they did, and what concerned them. Europeans usually described Indians in ways that differentiated Indians as the Other—as something not European, not "civilized."

Stereotyping

General English conceptions of Indians in early America fell into two categories: ignoble savages and noble savages. Both notions portrayed Indians...

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This section contains 1,597 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Native Americans: Images in Popular Culture Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Native Americans: Images in Popular Culture from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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