National Aeronautics and Space Administration - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 7 pages of information about National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
This section contains 1,974 words
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National Aeronautics and Space Administration

The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is the principal civilian space agency in the United States, and the leading space science agency in the world. Its scientific and technological activities pose a variety of ethical issues, from setting program priorities to environmental impacts and risk–safety tradeoffs. NASA decisions, however, rarely turn on explicitly ethical considerations (see, for example CAIB 2003, PCSSCA 1986). Common influences on NASA decisions include interest-group lobbying, Congressional politics, and intra-agency competition for resources.


Nasa's Mission and Other Space Activities

Legislation created NASA in 1958, building on existing civilian aviation research activities of the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics (NACA). The core of NASA's mission is space exploration, divisible into human exploration and space science. Human exploration includes, for example, the space shuttle and the International Space Station (ISS) in Earth orbit and the Apollo missions to...

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This section contains 1,974 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics
National Aeronautics and Space Administration from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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