Music, Vietnam Era - Research Article from Americans at War

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Vietnam, on the other hand, didn't really have an original theme or even a cadre of original artists to convey its messages. Many of the artists singing out about Vietnam were veterans of the "Ban the Bomb" and Civil Rights movements. In the early 1960s, Pete Seeger, Bob Dylan and Joan Baez broadened their focus to include Vietnam, and tailored their songs accordingly. "We Shall Over-come," a Civil Rights anthem, underwent minor lyrical modifications and soon became a staple of the anti-war movement. But generally, artists found themselves singing to a small group of people until 1962, when The Kingston Trio broke into Billboard Magazine's Top 100 Most Popular Songs with "Where Have All the Flowers Gone." The lyrics and melody were non-threatening, and its overall message was softened somewhat by the trio's harmonizing skills. The song peaked at number 21 on Billboard's chart, but still managed...

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This section contains 1,341 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Music, Vietnam Era Encyclopedia Article
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Americans at War
Music, Vietnam Era from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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