Mount Everest, Measurement Of - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Mathematics

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Early Mapping of the Earth

Fifty years before Lambton's proposed survey, French scientists determined that Earth is better described as an oblate spheroid instead of a sphere. This meant that the distance from Earth's center to the equator is greater than the distance from its center to either pole. Lambton's survey, renamed "The Great Trigonometrical Survey of India," would help calculate the amount of this equatorial bulge, and thereby result in a better model of Earth's shape. As an unintended by-product, a precise height of the Himalayan Mountains would also be sought.

Points on Earth are given a measurement of latitude and longitude. The longitudinal line passing through Greenwich, England, is called the Prime Meridian, and all lines of longitude are measured from it. Lambton's survey centered on the longitudinal line 78 degrees east from the prime meridian and running from India's southern tip to the Himalayan...

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This section contains 1,276 words
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Macmillan Science Library: Mathematics
Mount Everest, Measurement Of from Macmillan Science Library: Mathematics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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