Modern Logic: the Boolean Period - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Modern Logic: the Boolean Period

The eighteenth-century and early nineteenth-century logicians considered in the preceding section were all Continental Europeans, and those who were also philosophers, namely Leibniz and Bolzano, were representatives of Continental rationalism. The British empiricism of the same period produced no logicians. On the contrary, it was antilogical. The empiricists attacked formal logic—by which they meant the attenuated syllogistic to which much of the science had shrunk during the interregnum—as trivial and sometimes as circular. This antilogicism largely echoed John Locke, whose scornful treatment of logic in his Essay concerning Human Understanding had provoked one of Leibniz's minor defenses of it, in the Nouveaux Essais. In the early nineteenth century the common logic was rescued from oblivion by Richard Whately but was not enlarged by him. Its enlargement, however, came soon after and, despite the British antilogical tradition...

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This section contains 706 words
(approx. 3 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Modern Logic: the Boolean Period Encyclopedia Article
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Modern Logic: the Boolean Period from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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