Methodism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 298 pages of information about Methodism.
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The Name "Methodist"

The name "Methodist" derives from several possible sources. John Bingham of Christ Church, Oxford, used the term in derision in about 1732. He may have been describing the group's Arminian theology (opposing predestination), thus likening them to the "New Methodists" of the previous century, who, according to the Calvinists, used a "new," or bad, method in theology. John Wesley, the founder of Methodism, thought Bingham was referring to an ancient sect of Greek physicians called "Methodists," who promoted good health by prescribing a strict regimen of diet and exercise.

Although the name was thrust upon the group, Wesley adopted it for his movement, often using the phrase "the people called Methodists." In his compact English dictionary Wesley defined "Methodist" as "one who lives by the method described in the Bible." The regular and disciplined patterns of living that typified early Methodism are now most often cited...

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This section contains 3,726 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Methodism Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religious Practices
Methodism from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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