Medieval Philosophy - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 22 pages of information about Medieval Philosophy.
This section contains 6,575 words
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Nature of Scholasticism

Technical Language, Meaning, and Universals

Much of medieval philosophical and logical discourse involved the endowment of old words with new senses, as part of the artificialization of natural language that is characteristic of the Schoolmen, who, according to Locke, "covered their ignorance with a curious and inexplicable web of perplexed words." The Scholastics were in fact to some extent aware of the exigencies of discourse of this sort, which constitutes a kind of halfway house between the sort of philosophy that is careful to use only a completely jargon-free natural language, and the sort that is prepared to use the resources of some totally artificial language (such as those of modern symbolic logic) as a set of coordinates whereby sense and senselessness may be distinguished. When discussing the technical sense of "in" in sentences such as "Qualities inhere in substances," Boethius had distinguished no fewer...

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This section contains 6,575 words
(approx. 22 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medieval Philosophy Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Medieval Philosophy from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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