Medieval (European) Logic - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 230 pages of information about Medieval (European) Logic.
This section contains 12,469 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medieval (European) Logic Encyclopedia Article

The Boethian Background

Topical Inference

Medieval logic at least in the first half of the twelfth century was characterized by an intense interest in conditional propositions and in the nature of topical inference as formulated by Boethius in De Topicis Differentiis. Logicians at this time were not generally concerned to regiment arguments into the modes and figures of the categorical syllogism but everywhere they classified inferences in accordance with lists of topics, based upon those given by Boethius.

In his treatise Boethius proposes to show how arguments may be discovered to settle any given question. What has to be found, he claims, is what Cicero, in his Topica, calls an "argumentum"—defined as a "reason which brings conviction where something is in doubt." An argument (argumentatio) is the expression in speech or writing of the proof of a conclusion constructed with the required argumentum. A locus...

(read more)

This section contains 12,469 words
(approx. 42 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medieval (European) Logic Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Medieval (European) Logic from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook