Medieval Europe 814-1450: Music - Research Article from Arts and Humanities Through the Eras

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The Monophonic Secular Tradition

Regional Styles.

At the same time plainchant was being sung in the churches and monasteries, there was a rich body of monophonic music developing for non-religious use. In contrast to the unified nature of chant, which was more or less standard throughout Europe, the music of the laymen varied by region. The entire Western Christian church was controlled centrally by an enormous, stable hierarchy in Rome that extended to all regions, with a single official language—Latin—all of which resulted in a single, uniform practice. The secular world, on the other hand, was divided into autonomous regions that were subject to sudden political change and maintained separate languages and customs. A discussion of secular music, therefore, takes on a geographical/national character, reflecting local cultures and preferences. There are a number of similar basic elements in all areas, but...

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This section contains 1,764 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medieval Europe 814-1450: Music Encyclopedia Article
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Medieval Europe 814-1450: Music from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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