Medieval Europe 814-1450: Architecture and Design - Research Article from Arts and Humanities Through the Eras

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The Architecture of Daily Life

College Architecture.

One of the most original architectural contributions of the late Middle Ages was collegiate architecture. In the wake of the rise of universities throughout Europe in the late twelfth century, colleges were founded as safe and regulated residences for students who, at the beginning of their liberal arts studies, might be as young as thirteen or fourteen. Initially, colleges in Bologna, Cambridge, Paris, or Oxford were simply established in houses donated or purchased by a benefactor. The famous Sorbonne, founded in 1259 for theology students at the university, was initially located in a series of nondescript houses in the Latin Quarter of Paris. However, in the mid-thirteenth century monastic orders, such as the Cistercians and the Cluniacs, arriving in these centers of learning created enclosed compounds that limited contact with the seductions of the secular world. They adapted...

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This section contains 1,521 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medieval Europe 814-1450: Architecture and Design Encyclopedia Article
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