Medea - Research Article from Literature and Its Times

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 7 pages of information about Medea.
This section contains 2,109 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medea Encyclopedia Article

by Euripides

Euripides (485-406 B.C.) is regarded as one of the greatest of classical tragedians. Creator of more than ninety plays (although less than twenty are available in complete form), Euripides is cited by scholars as a dramatist who cultivated a more realistic tone than most of his contemporaries. His works often featured flawed, unheroic characters.

Events in History at the Time the Play Takes Place

Medea as an Athenian play. An Athenian citizen, Euripides revolutionized Greek tragedy by treating his mythic characters as if they were people of his own time, subject to the political and social pressures faced by everyday citizens in fifth-century B.C. Athens; although the play is set in Corinth, Euripides has his characters live according to Athenian customs. Medea's characters are drawn from Greek myth, a body of stories and legends that were passed on orally and regarded as historical accounts by...

(read more)

This section contains 2,109 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Medea Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Literature and Its Times
Medea from Literature and Its Times. ©2008 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook