Marxist Philosophy - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11 pages of information about Marxist Philosophy.
This section contains 3,140 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
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Marxist Philosophy

Marxist philosophy is the aggregation of philosophical ideas developed from various aspects of Karl Marx's social theory by later thinkers. Marx did not intend to write a philosophy and would have regarded "Marxist philosophy" as a contradiction in terms. He considered his work to be scientific, historical, and sociological, as opposed to "philosophical" divagations on social affairs, which he rejected as class-biased ideology. Moreover, he held that his social theory showed that philosophy was about to end. Philosophy, he said, was a symptom of social malaise and would disappear when revolution put society on a healthier foundation. The young Marx thought that this would happen because revolution would "realize" philosophy, would give solid reality to the ideal phantoms of reason, justice, and liberty that philosophers in sick societies consoled themselves with. The older Marx thought that revolution would...

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This section contains 3,140 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Marxist Philosophy Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Marxist Philosophy from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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