Macintyre, Alasdair (1929-) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5┬ápages of information about Macintyre, Alasdair (1929–).
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Tradition-Constituted Rationality

MacIntyre's view is that the most salient feature of contemporary moral and political discourse is interminable disagreement. Defenders of rival views become ever more sophisticated in the development and advocacy of their theories, but there is no progress toward resolution of these disagreements. It seems to be the aspiration of participants in these debates to offer a defense of their respective theories that is acceptable to any rational agent. MacIntyre calls this aim of providing a defense of morality acceptable to rational agents as such The Enlightenment Project, and holds that, for all the substantive differences between figures such as David Hume and Immanuel Kant, it is their common objective to provide a basis for morality that commands rational acceptance by all. After all, one might think that the alternative is an unacceptable relativism whereby different theories are justified in terms of different standards, with...

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This section contains 1,290 words
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Buy the Macintyre, Alasdair (1929-) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Macintyre, Alasdair (1929-) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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