Machiavelli, Niccolò (1469-1527) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Machiavelli, Niccolò (1469–1527).
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Arts of War

Machiavelli's statements were startling not only because of their form of presentation but also because of their content. One aspect of political affairs with which Machiavelli had been particularly concerned and in which he was especially interested was the conduct of military affairs. He thought deeply about the reasons why the French had so easily triumphed over the Italians in 1494 and had marched from the north to the south of Italy without meeting serious resistance. Machiavelli's explanation was that the governments of the various Italian states, whether they were republican regimes or principalities, had used mercenary soldiers led by hired condottieri. He therefore recommended that in case of war the prince should lead his troops himself and that his army should be composed of his own men; that is, the Italian governments should introduce conscription. Moreover, Machiavelli polemicized against other favorite notions...

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This section contains 2,463 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Machiavelli, Niccol (1469-1527) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Machiavelli, Niccolò (1469-1527) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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