Ludlow Massacre - Research Article from St. James Encyclopedia of Labor History Worldwide

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 12 pages of information about Ludlow Massacre.
This section contains 3,400 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
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Ludlow Massacre

United States 1914

Synopsis

In the Colorado coalfields, miners labored for long hours under extremely dangerous conditions for comparatively little pay. When the miners attempted to organize under the auspices of the United Mine Workers, most of the coal companies in the southern part of the state refused to recognize the union, prompting workers to go out on strike in September 1913. The dispute soon degenerated into one of the most violent strikes in U.S. history, with both sides guilty of beatings and murder. Efforts by the newly formed U.S. Department of Labor failed to have any effect, since the companies were adamant about refusing to do anything that would imply union recognition. The Colorado National Guard came in to protect the mines, but as was typical of the era, the soldiers actually worked to break the strike. The militia, joined by strikebreakers and company guards...

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This section contains 3,400 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Ludlow Massacre Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
St. James Encyclopedia of Labor History Worldwide
Ludlow Massacre from St. James Encyclopedia of Labor History Worldwide. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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