Locke, John (1632–1704) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 59┬ápages of information about Locke, John (1632–1704).
This section contains 17,450 words
(approx. 59 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Locke, John (1632–1704) Encyclopedia Article

Locke, John(1632–1704)

Character

The Lovelace Collection of Locke's personal papers in the Bodleian Library, Oxford, shows that Locke's character and personality were more complex than had been suspected. The great affection and respect which so many men and women had for him are testimony to his charm and wisdom. That he was modest, prudent, pious, witty, and eminently practical was long known. But he was also extremely secretive and apparently given to excessive suspicion and fears. When his lifelong friend, James Tyrrell, voiced his suspicion that Locke had written Two Treatises, Locke was evasive and would not admit the fact. When he suspected that Tyrrell was spreading the report that Locke was the author, Locke angrily demanded an explanation. At the same time, Locke showed great affection for many friends and a real fondness for children. In maturity he could not abide religious intolerance or suffer...

(read more)

This section contains 17,450 words
(approx. 59 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Locke, John (1632–1704) Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Locke, John (1632–1704) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.