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Research Article: Literature, World War II

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about Literature, World War II.
This section contains 1,339 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Literature, World War II Encyclopedia Article

Literature, World War II

Writers have long drawn on the experiences of war to examine themes such as race, power, democracy, and human behavior under conditions of stress. Partly through addressing these and similar issues with unprecedented candor and realism, U.S. war literature matured during and after World War II. Hundreds of war novels eventually appeared, some of outstanding craftsmanship. Many American poets did impressive work, and wartime journalism and postwar memoirs often exhibited a new subtlety and clarity. Only the most popular or original works and writers can be described here.

World War II novels comprise the most varied category in U.S. war literature. Harry Brown tells of small-unit combat in A Walk in the Sun (1944). John Hersey's A Bell for Adano (1944) suggests that the integrity of most Americans abroad will ultimately outweigh the arrogance and cruelty of a few. Hersey...

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This section contains 1,339 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Literature, World War II Encyclopedia Article
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