Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era - Research Article from American Revolution Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era.
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Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era

By the time of the American Revolution (1775–83), American writers had ventured beyond the Puritan literary style and its religious themes and had developed styles of writing that grew from distinctly American experiences. (The Puritans were a group of Protestants who broke with the Church of England; they believed that church rituals should be simplified and that people should follow strict religious discipline.) The colonial fascination with science, nature, freedom, and innovation came through in the writings of the Revolutionary period. The colonists developed their own way of speaking as well, no longer copying the more formal style of British writers. (Noah Webster's Blue-Backed Speller, published in 1783, helped to standardize the new American version of English.)

Author David Hawke offered an example of the American literary style in The Colonial Experience. Founding Father Benjamin...

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This section contains 3,748 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era Encyclopedia Article
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Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era from American Revolution Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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