Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era - Research Article from American Revolution Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 13 pages of information about Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era.
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What Colonial Children Read

Up until about twenty-five years before the Revolutionary War began, the reading material for American children was restricted basically to the Bible and other religious works. Gradually, additional books were published and read more widely. Rivaling the Bible in popularity were almanacs. Children loved to read them for the stories, weather forecasts, poetry, news events, advice, and other assorted and useful information they contained. The most famous of these was Benjamin Franklin's Poor Richard's Almanack, first published in 1732. Franklin (see box titled "The Many Sides of Benjamin Franklin") claimed to have written Poor Richard because his wife could not bear to see him "do nothing but gaze at the Stars; and has threatened more than once to burn all my Books… if I do not make some profitable Use of them for the good of my Family...

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This section contains 3,748 words
(approx. 13 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era Encyclopedia Article
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American Revolution Reference Library
Literature and the Arts in the Revolutionary Era from American Revolution Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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