Linkage and Recombination - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about Linkage and Recombination.
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Basic Concepts

Each individual inherits a complete set of twenty-three chromosomes from each parent, and chromosomes are therefore present in homologous pairs. The members of a pair carry the same set of genes at the same positions, or loci. The two genes at a particular locus may be identical, or slightly different. The different forms of a gene are called alleles.

Genes or loci can be linked either physically or genetically. Genes that are physically linked are on the same chromosome and are thus syntenic. Only syntenic genes can be genetically linked. Genes that are linked genetically are physically close enough to one another that they do not segregate independently during meiosis.

Understanding independent segregation is crucial to understanding linkage. Independent segregation was first discovered by Gregor Mendel, who found that, in pea plants, the different forms of two traits found in the parents, such as color...

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This section contains 1,443 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Linkage and Recombination Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Genetics
Linkage and Recombination from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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