Lexington, Concord, and the Organization of Colonial Resistance - Research Article from American Revolution Reference Library

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The Formation of the First Continental Congress

Patriot leaders (advocates of colonial authority) decided that the time was right for a formal meeting of representatives from all the colonies. Such a group could coordinate resistance to the British. As Virginia's lawmaking body, the House of Burgesses, stated: "We are … clearly of opinion, that an attack, made on one of our sister colonies, to compel submission to arbitrary taxes [to force the colonies to pay unreasonable taxes], is an attack made on all British America, and threatens ruin to the rights of all, unless the united wisdom of the whole be applied."

An assembly known as the First Continental Congress met at Philadelphia's Carpenter's Hall in September of 1774 to discuss the colonies' next move. Fifty-six delegates—all of them men—from twelve colonies were chosen to attend (Georgia did not...

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This section contains 5,159 words
(approx. 18 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Lexington, Concord, and the Organization of Colonial Resistance Encyclopedia Article
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Lexington, Concord, and the Organization of Colonial Resistance from American Revolution Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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