Kerosene - Research Article from Macmillan Encyclopedia of Energy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 5 pages of information about Kerosene.
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Kerosene

Kerosene is that fraction of crude petroleum that boils between about 330° to 550° F (183° to 305° C) (i.e. the distillate cut between gasoline and heavy fuel oil). What is usually thought of as kerosene, the domestic fuel or "range oil" commonly used for space heaters, is only a small part of this fraction. Diesel fuel, aviation jet fuel, and No. 1 and No. 2 heating oils also come from this general boiling range.

History

Petroleum was discovered by Drake in Pennsylvania in 1859. It is a mixture of hydrocarbon compounds ranging from highly flammable volatile materials like propane and gasoline to heavy fuel oil, waxes, and asphalt. It was soon discovered that crude oil could be separated by distillatoin in to various factions according to their boiling point (molecular weight). Kerosene, a middle distillate, was the first product made from petroleum that had a substantial commercial market. The...

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This section contains 1,251 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Kerosene Encyclopedia Article
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Kerosene from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.