Justice - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 23 pages of information about Justice.
This section contains 6,616 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
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Justice

Justice names not a thing, but a property of things. It makes sense therefore to focus the explication on the adjective "just"—or, better still, "unjust." Doing so facilitates clarification of how justice judgments are distinctive within the larger realm of moral judgments, and the even larger universe of evaluative judgments.

The application of ordinary empirical predicates, such as "tree" or "hard," is two-tiered: based on a definition and empirical facts. Any dispute about whether such a predicate applies thus reduces to linguistic and empirical differences. Such a dispute can be resolved by agreeing on a definition and settling the empirical disagreement.

Evaluative predicates, by contrast, have this special feature that their application is only conditioned, not determined, by their definition and the empirical facts. Thus, people can disagree about whether a painting is beautiful, even if they use...

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This section contains 6,616 words
(approx. 23 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Justice Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Justice from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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