Jupiter - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Space Sciences

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 8 pages of information about Jupiter.
This section contains 2,391 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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Historic Observations of Jupiter

Jupiter has intrigued humans since antiquity. It is named for the king of the Roman gods, and most of its twenty-eight moons are named after the god's many lovers. In 1609 and 1610, Italian mathematician and astronomer Galileo Galilei and German astronomer Simon Marius began telescopic studies of Jupiter and its system. Galileo is credited with the discovery of Jupiter's four largest moons: Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto, now called the Galilean satellites in his honor. These moons had an impact on the thinking of those times. It was believed then that Earth was the center of the universe and that all the planets and moons revolved around Earth. Galileo's observations showed that the four moons revolved around Jupiter, not Earth. This discovery contributed to Galileo's doom. He was condemned by the Catholic Church, forced to recant his discovery, and only in 1992 did Pope John Paul II...

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This section contains 2,391 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Jupiter Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Space Sciences
Jupiter from Macmillan Science Library: Space Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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