Jehovah's Witnesses - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 298 pages of information about Jehovah's Witnesses.
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The Slave Class

The doctrine of the "faithful and wise servant," or "faithful and discreet slave," is central to the Jehovah's Witnesse's authority structure. Originally, Bible Students (as Jehovah's Witnesses were called until 1931) taught that Charles Russell was the "faithful and wise servant." In 1927, however, Joseph Rutherford dropped this teaching and proclaimed that all Bible Students made up a "slave class" as the living remnant of the 144,000 members of Christ's church. Other Christians could go to heaven as a "great multitude" (the "great crowd"). But in 1935 Rutherford asserted that this great multitude would gain earthly salvation, not heavenly immortality. Since then the only Jehovah's Witnesses called to the slave class by the Holy Spirit have been replacements for those who had become unfaithful. Witnesses who feel they have a heavenly calling manifest this by partaking of Communion. Governing Body members must do so, and they speak...

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This section contains 2,453 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Jehovah's Witnesses Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religious Practices
Jehovah's Witnesses from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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