Icelandic Americans - Research Article from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 28 pages of information about Icelandic Americans.
This section contains 8,304 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Icelandic Americans Encyclopedia Article

Icelandic Americans

Overview

Iceland is the most westerly nation of Europe, the least populated, and was the last to be settled. A volcanic island, it touches the Arctic circle with its northernmost edge. Located between Greenland and Norway, the Gulf Stream brings mild temperatures to Iceland's otherwise inhospitable climate. Of its 103,000 square kilometers, only 1,000 are cultivated, with glaciers and lava taking up 23,000 square kilometers. It is often referred to as "the Land of Fire and Ice" because of its glaciers and volcanoes. In 1993, 264,000 persons lived in Iceland, residing mainly in towns located on its 5,000 kilometer coastline. The capitol city is Reykjavik, where almost half of the total population lives.

Iceland's fishing industry provides more than 70 percent of Icelandic exports. Aluminum accounts for about 11 percent. Ninety-three percent of Icelanders belong to the Lutheran Church of Iceland. The national language is Icelandic, a northern Germanic language with some resemblance to...

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This section contains 8,304 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Icelandic Americans Encyclopedia Article
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Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America
Icelandic Americans from Gale Encyclopedia of Multicultural America. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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