Humanism - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religion

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 12 pages of information about Humanism.
This section contains 3,472 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Humanism Encyclopedia Article

Italian Renaissance Humanism

It was natural that humanism should emerge most strongly in Italy, given the Roman inheritance and the artistic and architectural reminders of ancient glories. Toward the end of the thirteenth century, a form of protohumanism developed in the north of Italy, in Padua, Verona, and Vicenza, and in Arezzo and Florence in Tuscany. But the "father of humanism" was Francesco Petrarch (1304–1374), who gave to Italian literary humanism its basic character. He is perhaps best remembered for his vernacular lyrics, chiefly love poems to Laura; he was crowned poet laureate on the Capitoline Hill in Rome in 1341. Petrarch stressed the purity of the classical Latin style, revived enthusiasm for ancient Rome, and helped develop a sense of distance from the past and a revulsion toward the medieval "dark ages." He raised important personal and religious questions in such writings as On the Solitary Life, the Secretum...

(read more)

This section contains 3,472 words
(approx. 12 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Humanism Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Religion
Humanism from Encyclopedia of Religion. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook