Hormonal Regulation - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics

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Hormone Receptors

Regardless of the distance across which a hormone acts, only those cells that contain a specific receptor can respond to the corresponding hormonal signal. The expression of receptors only in the target cells ensures that these (and only these) cells respond in the appropriate way to the hormone, despite the possible presence of a large number of other hormones in the immediate surroundings.

In addition to the distance across which they act, hormones may be further divided into two large groups based on where in the target cell the hormone receptors are located. The first class consists of extracellular hormones that act via specific cell-surface receptors. Most hormones of this family are proteins (such as insulin, interferons, interleukins, and growth factors), fatty acid derivatives (such as prostaglandins and leukotrienes), or amino acid derivatives (such as serotonin and melatonin).

Extracellular hormones bind to specific receptors on the...

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This section contains 2,209 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hormonal Regulation Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Genetics
Hormonal Regulation from Macmillan Science Library: Genetics. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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