Homer - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 6 pages of information about Homer.
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The World

The Homeric world picture was of a flat, disk-shaped earth, with the sky set over the top like an inverted metal bowl and Hades underneath the earth in a more or less symmetrical relation to the sky. The sun, moon, and stars were taken to move across the fixed heaven from east to west, but the manner of their return journey was not clear. The space between the earth and the sky contained aer (mist), and above that was aether (the bright air of the upper heavens). The earth was completely surrounded by the river of Ocean, personified and deified as Okeanos. In one exceptional passage (Iliad, Book 14, 200–248) Okeanos is called "the begetter of gods" and "the begetter of all things." Aristotle (Metaphysics A 3, 982b27) half seriously suggested that Homer's Okeanos was the forerunner of Thales' cosmogonical water. Plato, even less seriously, suggested (Theaetetus 152E) that...

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This section contains 1,580 words
(approx. 6 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Homer Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Homer from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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