Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich (1770-1831) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 61┬ápages of information about Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich (1770–1831).
This section contains 18,263 words
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Main Themes of Hegel's Philosophy

Dialectic

Hegel is, of course, famous for his dialectical method, but it is enormously difficult to explain this in a brief compass. It should first be noted that Hegel set out his systematic writings in dialectical triads comprising a thesis, antithesis, and synthesis. Thus, he divided his Encyclopedia, in which he expounded his system as a whole, into three fundamental division sections—"Logic," "Philosophy of Nature," and "Philosophy of Mind." In the first he expounded the categories as developing forms of thought; in the second, he said "the Idea" is considered in its "otherness" (Anderssein) or externality; and in the third, mind is considered as existing "for itself," as conscious of itself and of the institutions it has given rise to. Within these main divisions there are further triadic subdivisions, although a very large number of subdivisions are not...

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This section contains 18,263 words
(approx. 61 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich (1770-1831) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Hegel, Georg Wilhelm Friedrich (1770-1831) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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