Happiness - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 8 pages of information about Happiness.
This section contains 2,198 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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Happiness

As an object of philosophical inquiry, the concept of happiness is as old as philosophy itself. It was central to the ethical thought of the Greeks, most famously Aristotle, and was restored to this position of prominence by the nineteenth-century utilitarians. Whether a principal theme or not, the pursuit of happiness plays some role in virtually all ethical traditions. Indeed, few would deny that happiness is one of the important goals in life, if not the only one. Through the twentieth century and into the twenty-first, both philosophers and psychologists have continued to ask questions about happiness. These questions fall into two broad categories: (1) The nature of happiness—in what does it consist? (2) The value of happiness—what is its role in a theory of ethics or of the good life?

What Happiness Is

The terms happy and happiness are used in many different ways, and...

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This section contains 2,198 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Happiness Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Happiness from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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