Guilt - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

John Lescroart
This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about Guilt.
This section contains 2,581 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
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There are two main forms of the idea of "guilt"—moral guilt and legal or quasi-legal guilt. Originally these were not sharply distinguished, but enlightened thought requires that they should be. In outward substance the two often coincide. In committing a crime one is usually morally at fault, but the degree of one's guilt is not likely to be the same in the two respects in such instances. We may in any case be morally guilty and legally innocent—and vice versa. Few who consult this book have committed a crime, but who is there who has never done anything for which he may be morally reproached? Some of the most vicious things men do are well within the law. Nor would it be wise to legislate against all forms of moral evil—much of that would defeat the purpose of morality. One may also break the law...

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This section contains 2,581 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Guilt Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Macmillan
Guilt from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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