Greek Drama - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 8 pages of information about Greek Drama.
This section contains 2,221 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Greek Drama Encyclopedia Article

Plato and Aristotle

It is well known that Plato was hostile to what he regarded as the inflated pretensions of the poets as moral and religious teachers and to the arrogant claims made on their behalf by rhapsodes and expositors. In numerous dialogues (notably in Apology, Ion, and Republic) he reiterated the complaint that poets lack the knowledge that, he believed, can be achieved only by rigorous philosophizing and that is necessary for the understanding of the human situation and the ordering of human life. The poets pronounce on life's problems without being able to "give an account" (λόγον διδόναι) of themselves and their ideas. Plato might ironically allow that, like conventional statesmen, they have some divinely inspired glimpses of moral and political truth, but he...

(read more)

This section contains 2,221 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Greek Drama Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Greek Drama from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook