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Research Article: Gothic Literature: an Overview

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 219 pages of information about Gothic Literature.
This section contains 65,407 words
(approx. 219 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Gothic Literature: an Overview Encyclopedia Article

Gothic Literature: an Overview

INTRODUCTION
REPRESENTATIVE WORKS
PRIMARY SOURCES
OVERVIEWS
ORIGINS OF THE GOTHIC
AMERICAN GOTHIC
EUROPEAN GOTHIC
FURTHER READING

Introduction

The origins of Gothic literature can be traced to various historical, cultural, and artistic precedents. Figures found in ancient folklore, such as the Demon Lover, the Cannibal Bridegroom, the Devil, and assorted demons, later populated the pages of eighteenth- and nineteenth-century Gothic novels and dramas. In addition, many seventeenth- and eighteenth-century works are believed to have served as precursors to the development of the Gothic tradition in Romantic literature. These works include plays by William Shakespeare, such as Hamlet (c. 1600–01), and Macbeth (1606), which feature supernatural elements, demons, and apparitions, and Daniel Defoe's An Essay on the History and Reality of Apparitions (1727), which was written to support religion and discourage superstition by providing evidence of the existence of good spirits, angels, and other...

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This section contains 65,407 words
(approx. 219 pages at 300 words per page)
Purchase our Gothic Literature: an Overview Encyclopedia Article
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