Global Positioning Systems - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Computer Sciences

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Global Positioning Systems.
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Global Positioning Systems

The Global Positioning System (GPS) is undoubtedly one of the most practical of all satellite projects. It provides navigation and location information to other satellites, commercial airliners, cruise ships, land surveyors, map makers, bicyclists, and hikers. GPS is based on a very simple theoretical principle that is complex to achieve practically.

The basic principle behind GPS is the measurement of distance—in this case, the distance between satellites and receivers on the ground. The satellites transmit a radio message. Their distance from the receiver can be easily calculated using the speed at which the message travels (the speed of light) and the time it takes to complete its travel. By comparing the time the signal was sent and received, the distance from the satellite can be calculated as: Distance = Speed (C) × Time Difference. If the satellite were directly overhead, the time...

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This section contains 1,055 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Global Positioning Systems Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan Science Library: Computer Sciences
Global Positioning Systems from Macmillan Science Library: Computer Sciences. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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