General Allotment Act - Research Article from St. James Encyclopedia of Labor History Worldwide

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 9 pages of information about General Allotment Act.
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United States 1887

Synopsis

The General Allotment Act, or Dawes Severalty Act, was passed by the U.S. Congress and signed by President Grover Cleveland in 1887 to give formally (or "allot") land to individual Native Americans. This federal policy would replace the existing communal tribal landholdings that historically had been a part of Native American culture with individual ownership of land. The allotments were usually 65 hectares (160 acres). U.S. Senator Henry Laurens Dawes sponsored the bill that intended to incorporate tribal members into the "civilized" white man's world, a world declared to be based on freedom, individualism, opportunity, and progress. The act stated that allotments could only be sold after a statutory period of 25 years, and all surplus lands not allotted to the Native Americans were open to public sale. Within a few decades following the passage of the act, whites owned the vast majority...

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This section contains 2,508 words
(approx. 9 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the General Allotment Act Encyclopedia Article
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General Allotment Act from Gale. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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