Galton, Francis - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Science, Technology, and Ethics

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Francis Galton (1822–1911), the scientist who created and promoted eugenics, the notion that a fitter human race might be created through selective breeding, was born near Birmingham, England, on February 16, and died in Haslemere, Surrey, England, on January 17. Originally oriented toward a medical career, Galton switched to Cambridge University to study mathematics, graduating with an ordinary degree. But his Cambridge experience was crucial to Galton's future career, during which he attempted to introduce quantitative analysis into whatever problem on which he happened to be working. His quantitative interests led Galton to discover the important statistical concepts of regression and correlation. He applied these in his anthropometric studies whose ultimate goal was to contribute to the improvement of humanity through eugenics, a term coined by Galton, that has profound ethical implications.

Galton's decision to abandon medicine was strongly influenced by his cousin, Charles Darwin (1809–1882), thirteen years his senior...

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This section contains 1,174 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Galton, Francis Encyclopedia Article
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Macmillan
Galton, Francis from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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