Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 16┬ápages of information about Galileo Galilei (1564–1642).
This section contains 4,626 words
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Philosophical Roots

Until Galileo's time, physical science (including theoretical astronomy) was regarded as a proper part of philosophy and was so taught in the universities. Aristotle's principles of motion supplied the axioms, and the science was purely deductive. Several of Galileo's predecessors had questioned those principles as being in apparent contradiction with experience; Galileo continued these attacks and undertook experimental investigations of the actual phenomena of motion. In this way he came upon some new results and sought principles from which both the old and new phenomena might be deductively established. If he was not entirely successful in this quest, that was not a matter of deep concern to him. René Descartes later criticized Galileo sharply for his investigation of physical effects without a prior knowledge of their causes, and Cartesian physics was made an integral part of Descartes's systematic...

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This section contains 4,626 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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