French Inventor Jacquard Produces a Weaving Loom Controlled by Punch Cards (1801), Facilitating the Mechanized Mass Production of Textiles; the Punch Card System Also Influences Early Computers in the 1940s and 1950s - Research Article from Science and Its Times

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Overview

In 1801 Joseph-Marie Jacquard (1752-1834), a French weaver distressed by the poor working conditions plaguing laborers, revolutionized the weaving process with his invention of the Jacquard loom. A highly influential innovation in textile technology, his automated loom used punch cards to control intricate weaving of patterns and fabrics with more efficiency than human hands. Jacquard's idea of programming an automated machine using punch cards was used to design the first automated calculators and was eventually part of the earliest computers developed. His invention not only impacted the industrial...

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This section contains 2,107 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the French Inventor Jacquard Produces a Weaving Loom Controlled by Punch Cards (1801), Facilitating the Mechanized Mass Production of Textiles; the Punch Card System Also Influences Early Computers in the 1940s and 1950s Encyclopedia Article
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