French and Dutch Immigration - Research Article from U.S. Immigration and Migration Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 28 pages of information about French and Dutch Immigration.
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Like Spain and England, France and the Netherlands sought to expand their empires in the seventeenth century. Both nations established important colonies, and each stood a good chance of building an enduring empire in North America. But the competition was becoming fierce among the European nations. No nation could hold onto territorial claims in the New World without populating the land with its people. Populating the early colonies meant a tremendous commitment: tens of thousands of people, many of whom might die; long-term financial investment that was extremely risky; and well-planned government and security systems in the New World that could hold the new settlements together. Although their methods of colonizing and their situations in the homelands differed greatly, both France and the Netherlands failed in some or all of these commitments and ultimately lost their North American colonies.

French Colonization in the New World

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This section contains 8,194 words
(approx. 28 pages at 300 words per page)
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French and Dutch Immigration from UXL. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.