France - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 16 pages of information about France.
This section contains 4,777 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
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Country Overview

Tolerance was first instituted in 1598 under the Edict of Nantes, which allowed Protestants to practice their faith. Afterward, however, the state and the Roman Catholic Church remained so intertwined that France had to go further than other countries in separating matters of state and matters of religion.

Notre-Dame-en-Vaux is one example of the Gothic cathedrals found in France. The Gothic style came about in the twelfth century in the region around Paris.  ELIO CIOL/CORBIS Notre-Dame-en-Vaux is one example of the Gothic cathedrals found in France. The Gothic style came about in the twelfth century in the region around Paris. © ELIO CIOL/CORBIS

This separation started with the Revolution of 1789 and was made final by law in 1905.

Modern France is constitutionally a secular state with individual religious freedom enshrined in article 1 [changed from article 2] of the constitution. Secularism (laïcisme) as defined by the French state means neutrality of the public authority toward beliefs and juridical guarantee of free expression and exercise of religion. The banning of visible religious symbols, such...

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This section contains 4,777 words
(approx. 16 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the France Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Religious Practices
France from Encyclopedia of Religious Practices. ©2005-2006 Thomson Gale, a part of the Thomson Corporation. All rights reserved.
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