Foucault, Michel (1926-1984) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 11┬ápages of information about Foucault, Michel (1926–1984).
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Archaeology

Folie et déraison (Madness and Civilization; 1965) is the first of Foucault's archaeological works. At the time it was published, Foucault's thinking ranged from psychology and the human sciences (in relation to Ludwig Binswanger, Gaston Bachelard, and Georges Canguilhem [1904–1995]) to Friedrich Nietzsche and avant-garde literature. The book is therefore a powerful introduction to the challenge posed to traditional philosophical practice (and the dominance of phenomenology and existentialism in France) by the growing interest in structuralism, psychoanalysis, and postmodernism. Combining a materialist historical approach associated with the Annales group (Ernst Bloch, Henri Lefebvre [1901–1991], and Fernand Braudel [1902–1985]) and an ontology of the subject derived from his engagement with literature and his critical approach to psychoanalysis, Madness and Civilization established Foucault as an important philosopher and social critic in France.

The Asylum and the Clinic

Madness and Civilization traces the emergence of a form...

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This section contains 3,062 words
(approx. 11 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Foucault, Michel (1926-1984) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Foucault, Michel (1926-1984) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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