Ferns - Research Article from Macmillan Science Library: Plant Sciences

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 4 pages of information about Ferns.
This section contains 1,023 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
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Ferns, like the more familiar seed plants, have stems, roots, and large, highly veined leaves. Ferns do not reproduce by seeds, however, and have several other distinctive features. The leaf of a fern is called a frond and, in many species, the green blade is divided into segments called pinnae. The leaves of most ferns have a distinctive juvenile stage called a fiddlehead, where all the segments are curled in a manner resembling the end of a violin's neck. Most ferns have underground stems called rhizomes and the only parts of the fern plant visible above ground are the leaves. Some tropical ferns, called tree ferns, have erect, unbranched stems up to 20 meters tall with all of the fronds arising from the tip. Ferns are perennial plants and some may grow for many years, but, as they lack annual growth rings, their age is not easily determined. However...

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This section contains 1,023 words
(approx. 4 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Ferns Encyclopedia Article
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Ferns from Macmillan. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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