Excerpt from Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe - Research Article from American Civil War Reference Library

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Things to Remember While Reading the Excerpt from Harriet Beecher Stowe's Uncle Tom's Cabin:

  • Stowe uses a literary device called irony in her novel—she says the opposite of what she means in order to make a point. A good example of Stowe's use of irony occurs in the following excerpt, when she describes the different reactions of Haley and Tom when Lucy's child is taken from her. When Stowe describes Haley's reaction, she says that "the trader had arrived at that stage of Christian and political perfection . . . in which he had completely overcome every humane weakness and prejudice." Haley feels no sympathy for the young mother—he has lost the basic human tendency to care about someone else. But Stowe makes it seem as if Haley's feelings are normal and right, even perfect, in the eyes...

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This section contains 4,251 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Excerpt from Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe Encyclopedia Article
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American Civil War Reference Library
Excerpt from Uncle Tom's Cabin by Harriet Beecher Stowe from American Civil War Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.