Evolutionary Theory - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 17 pages of information about Evolutionary Theory.
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Darwin's Theory of Evolution

Darwin was not persuaded that evolution occurred by any of his evolutionist predecessors. The true history of his development of his ideas is controversial (Sloan 2005), but there were perhaps four main influences on him in this respect.

One was the Principles of Geology (1931), written by his mentor and friend, the geologist Charles Lyell (1797–1875), which Darwin read at the start of his famous five-year journey on the Beagle (1831–1836). Darwin was profoundly influenced by Lyell's methodological, as well as his factual claims. With respect to the former, Lyell was a uniformitarian. Broadly speaking, uniformitarianism is the view that the laws of nature have always been the same. For Lyell, this meant that geological features are to be explained by natural ("intermediate" not miraculous) processes that can still be observed to be in operation. Since he thought that these tended to bring about only slow...

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This section contains 5,086 words
(approx. 17 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Evolutionary Theory Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Evolutionary Theory from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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