Eternity - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 10 pages of information about Eternity.
This section contains 2,780 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Eternity Encyclopedia Article

Eternity

The word eternal is derived from the Latin aeternus, a contraction of aeviternus, which, in turn, is derived from aevum, a word from the same root as the English words ever and aye. In Greek the corresponding adjectives are even more obviously connected with the notion of everlasting existence. This is the original sense of the word eternal and probably also the sense that is still the most common in ordinary language. But in certain philosophical contexts the notion of everlasting existence is expressed rather by "sempiternal," "eternal" being reserved for the sense of "timeless."

The "Timeless Present" in Science

In English and other Indo-European languages there is a usage described by grammarians as the timeless present. When, for example, we say, "Seven is a prime number," we do not intend our use of the present tense to convey anything about the present as distinct from the...

(read more)

This section contains 2,780 words
(approx. 10 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Eternity Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Eternity from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook