Epicureanism and the Epicurean School - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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The Epicureans perpetuated their founder's teaching with little change. Of Epicurus's immediate circle, the most distinguished was Metrodorus of Lampsacus (c. 330–277 BCE), who predeceased his master. Metrodorus was elevated by Epicurus to a position of eminence—he alone shared the appellation "wise" (sophos), and his works were regarded as authoritative statements of doctrine. He wrote on epistemology, ethics, religion, poetry, and rhetoric, and he composed polemics against Plato's Gorgias and Euthyphro, and against Democritus.

Colotes of Lampsacus, another member of the original circle, published a comprehensive refutation of other schools under the title "That the Doctrines of the Other Philosophers Actually Make Life Impossible." Our knowledge of it comes from Plutarch's Reply to Colotes. His other writings included attacks on Plato's Lysis and Euthydemus and on the myth of Er in the Republic.

Hermarchus of Mytilene (325–c. 250 BCE) was Epicurus's successor as head of the school. His...

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This section contains 1,214 words
(approx. 5 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Epicureanism and the Epicurean School Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Epicureanism and the Epicurean School from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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