Energy [addendum] - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

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Energy [addendum]

Force is among the most fundamental concepts in Newtonian physics. Energy became an important unifying concept in nineteenth-century physics. Energy and force take on somewhat different roles in relativity and quantum mechanics.

Force in Classical Physics

In classical physics, force is a vector quantity. Isaac Newton's second law of motion (F = ma) relates the net force (F) on a body to its mass (m) and acceleration (a) in an inertial reference frame. Newton's third law says that the force exerted by body A on body B is equal and opposite to the force that B exerts on A. To apply Newton's laws of motion in a non-inertial frame, correction factors with the dimensions of force ("pseudoforces") must be introduced, such as the Coriolis and centrifugal forces.

The constituents of a system of bodies (such as a macroscopic object) exert "internal forces" upon one another, whereas "external...

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This section contains 2,372 words
(approx. 8 pages at 300 words per page)
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Energy [addendum] from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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