Electrifying Rural America - Research Article from Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 15 pages of information about Electrifying Rural America.
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Few Electrified Farms

Electric power began to serve American industry, businesses, and homes in the cities by the 1880s. However, for many years electrification was regarded as a luxury. But by the 1920s electric power was becoming an essential part of modern life. More than half of all urban homes had electric lights, and many of those homes had electric appliances. Despite these advances in cities, few farm families had electricity. By 1930 more than 90 percent of rural homes still used kerosene lamps for lighting; and running water and indoor bathrooms were impossible without powered pumping systems.

President Herbert Hoover (1874–1964; served 1929–33) took a hands-off approach in dealing with such problems. Hoover was solidly in favor of electrification and wanted to improve the lives and productivity of all Americans, including farmers. However, he also believed that private enterprise (a business belonging to an individual or group of...

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This section contains 4,388 words
(approx. 15 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Electrifying Rural America Encyclopedia Article
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Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library
Electrifying Rural America from Great Depression and New Deal Reference Library. ©2005-2006 by U•X•L. U•X•L is an imprint of Thomson Gale, a division of Thomson Learning, Inc. All rights reserved.
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