Education - Research Article from Americans at War

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 7 pages of information about Education.
This section contains 1,877 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Education Encyclopedia Article

Education in the Early Nineteenth Century

Throughout much of the nineteenth century, many American children—regardless of race, class, or gender—did not attend school because they had to work or because their parents could not afford to pay the required fees. Those children who did become educated were taught at home by a parent or tutor, went to a school run by a church or charity, or attended a privately-run school. "Subscription schools" were supported by middle class families and charged a fee based on the number of children enrolled. The poor, if their children did attend school, had to sign documents stating that they were "paupers" in order for their children to be admitted to poverty schools. Most institutions provided schooling only for privileged white boys. A small number of young men could go on to one of several colleges established in America, such as...

(read more)

This section contains 1,877 words
(approx. 7 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Education Encyclopedia Article
Copyrights
Americans at War
Education from Americans at War. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
Follow Us on Facebook