Duns Scotus, John (C. 1266-1308) - Research Article from Encyclopedia of Philosophy

This encyclopedia article consists of approximately 36┬ápages of information about Duns Scotus, John (C. 1266–1308).
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Scotus's early death interrupted the final editing of his most important work, the monumental commentary on the Sentences known as the Ordinatio (or in earlier editions as the Commentaria Oxoniensia or simply the Opus Oxoniense). An outgrowth of earlier lectures begun at Oxford and continued on the Continent, this final version was dictated to scribes, with instruction to implement it with materials from his Paris and Cambridge lectures. A modern critical edition of the Ordinatio, begun by the Typis Polyglottis Vaticanis (Vatican Press) in 1950, is still in progress. Though less extensive in scope, Scotus's Quaestiones Quodlibetales are almost as important; they express his most mature thinking as regent master at Paris. Also authentic are the Quaestiones Subtilissimae in Metaphysicam on Aristotle's Metaphysics; some forty-six shorter disputations held in Oxford and Paris and known as Collationes; and a series of logical writings in the form...

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This section contains 10,632 words
(approx. 36 pages at 300 words per page)
Buy the Duns Scotus, John (C. 1266-1308) Encyclopedia Article
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Encyclopedia of Philosophy
Duns Scotus, John (C. 1266-1308) from Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Copyright © 2001-2006 by Macmillan Reference USA, an imprint of the Gale Group. All rights reserved.
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